Kennedy Half Dollar

1964 – Current Three months after the assasination of President Kennedy the US Mint changed the design of the silver half dollar to honor JFK. In 1964, when the Kennedy Half Dollar was first minted, it contained the usual 90% silver content (11.25 g) that Americans were familiar with. A year later the silver content was reduced and the coin was lightened. From 1965 up through 1970 Kennedy Half Dollars contain only 40% silver, which comes out to 4.60 g per coin. When 1971 rolled around Americans were presented with half dollars which contained nothing more than copper and nickel. Kennedy Half Dollar In 1965 the composition of US dimes and quarters were also changed to remove the silver. And finally in 1970, with the removal of silver from the half dollar, the days of silver coinage being...

US Commemorative Coins 2007 – 2008

2007 The Virginia Company of London, England landed on the shores of what would be the United States of America in 1607.  These would be the first English settlers in the New World. The 400th anniversary of their settlement, Jamestown (named for King James of England) was honored with two commemorative coins. The silver dollar coin has on its obverse an engraving of three faces representing diversity of the different cultures brought together in the New World. On its reverse there is the image of the three ships that brought the English Virginia Company to North America; The Susan Constant, Godspeed, and the Discovery. (500,000 minted) It is 90% silver and 10% copper. Jamestown Commemorative Silver Dollar The five dollar gold coin has on its obverse the legendary Captain John Smith meeting...

Investing In Silver With Coin Collecting

Collecting US silver coins is an excellent way of investing in silver for your future. Not only are silver coins a solid investment they provide a fascinating hobby as well. A nicely presented coin collection is a thing of beauty; you can see and feel the value in your hands. In recent years the value of silver has risen and it is expected to continue going up in the future. However, the value of a coin is in more than just its metal content. A coin also has “collectable value” based upon its rarity. Naturally, the more common a coin is the less its collectable value will be. Many silver coins are in such short supply that they value significantly more than their silver content, while others are so common that they can be obtained very near to their silver value – an excellent...

US Silver Coins of The 1800s

Of all the coins that were minted in the United States during the 1800s, the Morgan Silver Dollar is by far the most sought after. Anyone who has received one of these as a hand me down from an older relative stands to cash in on a significant pay day. Some people go so far as to refer to the Morgan Silver Dollar as the king of all United States issued silver coins. After this many years, the pure beauty of this silver coin remains breathtaking. If one were to attempt to buy a certain date/mint Morgan Silver Dollar that is found to be in mint condition, they could expect to pay no less than $2,000. Morgan Silver Dollar   Another silver coin that was minted during the 1800’s is the Liberty Seated Dime. Although this coin isn’t nearly as common as Morgan Silver Dollars, it is...

Investing In Rare Gold And Silver Coins

Anyone wanting a relatively safe and fun way to invest their money may want to consider joining the growing rare gold and silver coin collector’s market. Due to the increasing number of people starting their own collection, the lower rates of interest, the decreasing value of the dollar and the daily changes in the stock market, the coin market is exploding. That combined with the shrinking supply of available coins has resulted in the value of both gold and silver coins experiencing a continued growth. There are many additional benefits to beginning coin collecting. Since neither gold nor silver can be duplicated or manufactured by humans, so their value remains constant, which is very reassuring to investors. Another appealing benefit is that because gold and silver are legal tender, they...

Peace Dollar

1921-1928  &  1934-1935 The Silver Peace Dollar was originally proposed to be a commemorative coin issued to memorialize with the ending of World War I; however the final decision was made to issue the Silver Peace Dollar as a circulating coin. The coin, which got its name from having the word “peace” imprinted at the bottom of the coin’s reverse, was designed by Anthony de Francisi. The replacement to the Morgan Silver Dollar, the Silver Peace Dollar was struck from 1921 until 1928, then after a pause of six years it was minted again in 1934 and 1935. The Silver Peace Dollar was briefly minted again in 1965 (bearing the date 1964) but no examples were ever released and eventually melted down.  Containing 0.77344 troy ounces of silver, the Silver Peace Dollar was the last...

Morgan Silver Dollar

1878-1904 & 1921 The Morgan Silver Dollar, which was named after its designer, George T. Morgan, was minted from 1878 – 1904 and then again for one year in 1921. Each Morgan Silver Dollar has a finesse of .900 which gives it 0.77344 troy ounces, or 24.057 grams of silver. The coin was commissioned after the Bland-Allison Act was passed; which called for the US Treasury Department to buy large amounts of silver, and strike it into coins. This was at a time when the cost of silver was very low due to the Comstock Lode silver strike in Nevada; which to this day is the largest silver strike in history. The Morgan Silver Dollar was minted up to 1904 when there was a large supply of the dollars in circulation and a shortage of silver bullion. Finally in 1918 the Pittman act was passed...