Barber Quarter History & Information

Barber Quarter 1892–1916 The Barber quarter was designed by Charles E. Barber and first minted in 1892. Barber was Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint at that time. The Barber quarter was minted of 90% silver and 10% copper and used the same design as the half dollar and dime (Barber Dime). The Barber dime displays Lady Liberty on the obverse with a Phrygian cap encircled with a laurel wreath and a ribbon. The inscription on the headband reads “LIBERTY”. The reverse was a very simple design consisting of a wreath around the words “One Dime”. Mint marks, if present, appear at the bottom below the ribbon that ties the wreath. 1901 Barber Quarter Barber quarters were widely circulated yet one is more likely to find a higher grade example than they are a rare date. Some Barber quarter date...

America the Beautiful Quarters for 2011

The America the Beautiful Quarter Program will feature 56 different US National Sites. The obverse or “heads”, of all will be the classic George Washington profile designed by by John Flanagan in 1932. The reverse, or “tails” side of the coins will honor a U.S. national park or other significant national site. The America the Beautiful Quarter Program started up in 2010 with the release of coins honoring the Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Yosemite National Park in California, Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona, and Mt. Hood National Forest in Oregon. The Gettysburg National Military Park Quarter 2011 Gettysburg National Military Park Quarter The first America the Beautiful Quarter released in 2011 is the Gettysburg National...

Collecting U.S. State Quarters

Since the release of the individual state quarters, coin collecting has become a more popular hobby. The U.S. State Quarter program began in 1999 and each state was released in the order in which it joined the union. The U.S. Mint estimates that around 147 million people have been collecting the state quarters since their release. The program is also credited for drawing in new collectors and increasing the general public’s interest in coin collecting overall. Due to its popularity, more coin programs are currently in the works for the next several years. The process in which each design was selected took cooperation from congress, the U.S. Mint, and each individual state. Once the governor is contacted, the state provided three to five narrative descriptions of possible design ideas. This...