Collecting British Silver Coins

Collecting old British silver coins can be a great start to any coin collection. These coins are great in many ways – You can learn their history, the coins are collectible and you are also building up a stash of silver. Coin collecting is also an extremely enjoyable hobby that can be enjoyed by the whole family! Of course it stands to reason that the older the coins the more expensive they are going to be to collect. However this hobby is to be enjoyed by everyone and can be done “on the cheap”. If you mainly concentrate on silver coins/shillings from the 1900’s you will easily build your collection. Don’t forget that other people are also into this hobby as well and so as you upgrade your collection you can sell off your surplus coins and make some extra money to put towards...

Collecting British Coins

Collecting British Coins can be quite a fun hobby, but it can also be a pretty expensive Hobby. Although you can pick up some bronze roman coins for about $2 a piece. But at the other end of the scale you have something like the 1933 penny which is worth about $50,000. Firstly you need to decide where to start your collection. You can choose to collect a particular denomination from a particular date, or you could choose to collect a type set from a particular sovereign. There are quite a number of avid British coin collectors in Britain and United States. A good way to get information and learn more about collecting British coins is to join forums where you can talk to like-minded people who share your interest. There are also many weblogs on coin collecting full of useful and interesting...

British Coins Early & Modern Collecting Guide

Are you a believer that there is money in old coins?  Or do you have a keen interest to learn more about collecting British coins?  It is certainly more than possible to pick up bronze Roman coins for about $2 and the average Roman or Celtic coin might set you back around $60. On the other hand, a 1933 penny would be worth a cool $50,000 simply based on their extreme rarity value.  Of course there were enough pennies in circulation pertaining to that specific year but the Mint struck first just seven sample pennies first, to test the dies.  A total of three of these went into the cornerstones of buildings and another three currently reside in museums which leaves just one out there somewhere, remaining.  If you were fortunate enough to come across this specific one penny, count yourself...