Welcome to the Coin Collector Guide!

Collecting coins can be a lot much more than just a hobby. If it approached the right way collecting coins can be an investment. Learn how to get the best out of collecting coins. Read about the history and specifications of various coins and educate yourself about coins in general. Learn how to get the best value when you are looking to buy coins.

Here you will find detailed information about some of the most popularly collected coins as well as articles about coin care, coin history, error and die variety coins and more.

Coin collecting can be both enjoyable and profitable. If you would like to build a valuable coin collection read and learn as much as you can about the hobby.

On these pages you can learn about the history and design of coins, how to make the best decisions on which coins to buy, how to store and protect your coins and other information about the hobby.

Learn as much as you can about the particular coins you are looking to buy and about the market so you don't pay too much. Having a nice coin collection can be something to be proud of but you don't want to over pay!

To see more, or to find what you are looking for, use the search box, browse through the categories, or see the full index of articles. The newest articles are listed below.

Engelhard Silver Prospector The First Silver Round

The .999 pure silver Prospector from Engelhard is without question the most well known and trusted silver round ever produced. Most people who collect coins and especially those who are interested in investing in precious metals are familiar with the Engelhard name. “Engelhard” is equivalent to strict standards and high quality. The name gives both buyers and sellers of silver confidence in the silver rounds value – or at the least it will convey more confidence than other silver rounds. In the late 1970s Engelhard, Johnson-Matthey and several other silver refineries started manufacturing silver bullion for sale to investors and collectors. In the beginning it was almost entirely 10 and 100 ounce bars. But soon numerous companies were offering smaller units. Engelhard Silver...

The 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Coin

The 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Coin series will be the first curved coins ever to be minted by the United States Mint. OK, so the United States Mint is celebrating the diamond anniversary of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum with a series of coins. The obverse of the coins shows a glove. The convex shape gives the glove the look that it really might catch a baseball. The reverse shows a baseball and has the Inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, and HALF DOLLAR. As of the time of this writing, June 16, 2014, the US Mint has already sold out of all silver dollars and gold $5 coins. The proof clad half-dollar will be released on July 16, 2014. The uncirculated clad half-dollar will be available a couple weeks later on July 30. Altogether 750,000 clad half-dollars...

Silver Rounds – What You Should Know

Silver Rounds are actually a type of silver bar. Instead of being rectangular in shape a silver round looks like a large coin. Silver rounds are 99.9% pure silver, which is generally indicated on the piece as “999 Fine Silver”. These round bars are most often available as one troy ounce although in recent years smaller units such as halves and quarters are becoming popular. They have been minted by many different manufacturers. Most notable are Engelhard, APMEX, Disney, Silvertowne. Buying silver rounds is a great way to stock up on the metal at close to spot value. In fact you can buy them for less than a couple dollars or so above silver spot! Because of the low premium (price paid above spot value) this form is silver is often chosen as an alternative to such as the American...

Scrip – Coal Company Tokens

There was a time when there were more than 20,000 company stores using scrip in pace of, or in addition to, cash wages in North America.(*1) It has been estimated that around 75% of all the scrip that was used was used by coal companies in Eastern Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. People in these areas called the tokens “scrip” and the name stuck and is what is still used today. Scrip was known by many other names in the early days, among them: Trade Tokens, Flickers, Secos, Clackers, Checks, P’Lollys, Good Fors, Lightweights, Bingles, Stickers, Chink-tins and Dugaloos (keep in mind that scrip came in paper as well as in metal form).  (*2) Scrip Started As A Company Store Trade Credit Scrip Coupon Book Scrip started out as a trade credit for the company store. For example,...

Current Silver Spot Price

Silver spot price have dropped quite a bit since I last posted here. Opinions range from “sell, sell, sell!” to “It’s time to buy!” Some folks lost a lot of value in their portfolio over the past year while others played it better and still came out ahead in the market. To the right you will see a chart with the current silver spot price. The chart is dynamic, which means that it will always update with the current values. Current Silver Spot Price Spot Price Spot Price At the time of this writing silver is bouncing around the $19.20 mark. That is close to half what silver was fetching about a year ago. At these low rates it would be much easier for folks to add some silver to their “portfolio” or “nest egg” than what it was a year ago....

Canadian Silver Maple Leaf

The Canadian Silver Maple Leaf is a one troy ounce (31.1 g of silver) silver bullion coin minted by the Royal Canadian Mint. The silver bullion coins have been issued yearly since 1988. While the U.S. Silver Eagle bears a face value of only $1, the Canadian bullion Silver Maple Leaf shows $5. Regardless of the face value however the coin contains one troy ounce of pure silver making it very unlikely that it will ever trade at face value. Personally I think the practice of placing a face value on these bullion coins is a bit odd. What is the purpose of a face value on a coin other than to reflect, or at least be an index of, its market value? But that is how it is, and it is interesting to note that Canada puts a much higher face value on their silver ounce coins than does the U.S. Canadian...

Junk Silver Prices And Rolls

About two and a half years ago I bought a few rolls of junk silver dimes for around $65 to $70 each including shipping. I shopped around and got them from different online auctions and websites. Even then the prices I found were barely above the spot silver value of the coins at that time. Individual 90% silver dimes were going for 2 to 3 bucks each and generally that was “plus postage”. My intent was to buy full rolls. If I had bought 50 dimes individually at that price I would have paid as much as $200 for a roll instead of $68 total. Junk Silver Can Help When You’re In A Bind 90% Junk Silver Dimes Awhile back we had some unexpected expenses and over a period of time I sold my rolls. The last ones went for $140, and that was ‘wholesale’ at a pawn shop! Now they...

Junk Silver Coins – Should I Invest In It?

The term “junk silver coins” refers to silver US coins minted before 1964 which were actually made up of 90% silver and 10% copper. This included dimes, quarter dollars, half dollars, and dollars as well as some special issue coins. US minted coins are recognized around the world and known for their silver content. This makes them easy to trade on and well trusted. Average circulated 90% silver coins are often sold in $1000.00 face value bags. A quarter bag would be $250.00, a half bag would be $500.00. At the time of this writing junk silver is available for around $24 to $25 per dollar face value when you buy a full bag. The going rate for $1 face value will vary depending upon the quantity you purchase. 90% Junk Silver Coins Bag A full $1000 face value bag  of junk silver coins...